Weekly Reader - September 5, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - September 5, 2022
Photo by Elisa Calvet B. / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Unraveling the Interplay of Omicron, Reinfections, and Long Covid. (Kaiser Health News) "Although omicron infections are proving milder overall than those caused by last summer’s delta variant, omicron has also proved capable of triggering long-term symptoms and organ damage. But whether omicron causes long covid symptoms as often — and as severe — as previous variants is a matter of heated study."
  • Moderna sues Pfizer and BioNTech over coronavirus vaccine patent. (The Washington Post) “Moderna sued Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech on Friday, alleging that the rival firms improperly used its foundational technology in developing their coronavirus vaccine. ”
  • Congressman’s Wife Died After Taking Herbal Remedy Marketed for Diabetes and Weight Loss. (Kaiser Health News) "The wife of a Northern California congressman died late last year after ingesting a plant that is generally considered safe and is used as an herbal remedy for a variety of ailments, including diabetes, obesity, and high cholesterol[.]"
  • This Is Not the Monkeypox That Doctors Thought They Knew. (New York Times) “The patients turning up at clinics often have a range of symptoms that are not typical of the infection. Some of the infected seem to have no symptoms at all.”
  • With More Sizzling Summers, Colorado Changes How Heat Advisories Are Issued. (Kaiser Health News) "The National Weather Service in Colorado adopted a prototype heat warning index, known as HeatRisk, that is used in California and other parts of the Western U.S. and relies on local climate data to determine how much hotter than normal the temperature will be[.]"
  • Amazon is shutting down its telehealth service, Amazon Care. (CNBC) “Amazon Care launched in 2019 as a pilot program for employees in and around the company’s Seattle headquarters. It’s unclear how much traction Amazon Care had gained.”
  • Hospitals Cut Jobs and Services as Rising Costs Strain Budgets. (Kaiser Health News) "The pandemic has intensified a long-running health care worker shortage that has hit especially hard in large, rural states like Montana, which have few candidates to replace workers who depart."
  • Minnesota Set to Become “Abortion Access Island” in the Midwest, but for Whom? (ProPublica) “Out-of-staters have long traveled to Minnesota for abortions, but as neighboring states restrict access to the procedure, data suggests patients of color may not make the trip.”
  • Rural Americans Have Difficulty Accessing a Promising Cancer Treatment. (Kaiser Health News) "Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy might have been appealing to [those with stage 5 lymphoma] if it were available closer to her home. But it is offered only at major transplant hospitals."
  • Can’t afford insulin? You’re not alone as it’s a ‘catastrophic health’ expense for [more] than 1 million people with diabetes, Yale finds. (Hartford Courant) “Insulin has been available for 100 years to contain diabetes, but a doubling in price in the last 20 years has made it nearly — or totally — unaffordable for low-income Americans, according to a study by a Yale School of Medicine researcher.”
  • Policies to Roll Back Abortion Rights Will Hit Incarcerated People Particularly Hard. (Kaiser Health News) "After the June ruling, many reproductive services stand to be prohibited altogether, putting the health of incarcerated women who are pregnant at risk."