Weekly Reader - October 3, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - October 3, 2022
Photo by freestocks / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Court Ruling May Spur Competitive Health Plans to Bring Back Copays for Preventive Services. (Kaiser Health News) “Now health plans and self-insured employers — those that pay workers’ and dependents’ medical costs themselves — may consider imposing cost sharing for preventive services on their members and workers. That’s because of a federal judge’s Sept. 7 ruling in a Texas lawsuit[.]”
  • More Trans Teens Are Choosing ‘Top Surgery’. (New York Times) “Small studies suggest that breast removal surgery improves transgender teenagers’ well-being, but data is sparse. Some state leaders oppose such procedures for minors.”
  • New Abortion Laws Jeopardize Cancer Treatment for Pregnant Patients. (Kaiser Health News) "As abortion bans go into effect across a contiguous swath of the South, cancer physicians are wrestling with how new state laws will influence their discussions with pregnant patients about what treatment options they can offer."
  • The TikTok fitness craze Hot Girl Walk is worth trying. (The Washington Post) “Here’s how it works: Walk. Every day. Ideally, about four miles. And while you walk, you can think only of the following: Your goals. What you’re grateful for. And how hot you are.”
  • With Polio’s Return, Here’s What Back-to-Schoolers Need to Know. (Kaiser Health News) "As polio appears again decades after it was considered eliminated in the U.S., Americans unfamiliar with the dreaded disease need a primer on protecting themselves and their young children — many of whom are emerging from the trauma of the covid-19 pandemic."
  • Alzheimer’s treatment slowed cognitive decline in closely watched clinical trial. (Stat) “An investigational Alzheimer’s disease treatment from Biogen and Eisai slowed the rate of cognitive decline by 27% in a clinical trial, the companies said Tuesday, meeting the goals of a closely tracked study and strengthening the drug’s case for approval as early as January.”
  • Doctors Rush to Use Supreme Court Ruling to Escape Opioid Charges. (Kaiser Health News) "In a June decision, the court said prosecutors must not only prove a prescription was not medically justified ― possibly because it was too large or dangerous, or simply unnecessary ― but also that the prescriber knew as much."
  • From BTS to Zoom therapy, why Korean Americans are seeking more mental health help. (Los Angeles Times) “The COVID-19 pandemic and the shifting attitude on mental health in Korean culture pushed more Korean Americans to seek therapy for the first time.”
  • Clearing Pollution Helps Clear the Fog of Aging — And May Cut the Risk of Dementia. (Kaiser Health News) "During the past decade, a growing body of research has shown that air pollution harms older adults’ brains, contributing to cognitive decline and dementia. What hasn’t been clear is whether improving air quality would benefit brain health."
  • This Common Sleep Aid Is The No. 1 Reason Parents Are Calling Poison Control. (HuffPost) “Melatonin use has skyrocketed in recent years — and so have accidental overdoses.”
  • Texas, Battling Teen Pregnancy, Recasts Sex Education Standards. (Kaiser Health News) "Texas has [one of] the nation’s highest rate of repeat teen pregnancies. This fall, school districts across Texas are marking a shift to what educators call an 'abstinence-plus' curriculum — the first time the state has revised its standards for sexual health education in more than 20 years."