Weekly Reader - October 24, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - October 24, 2022
Photo by Dose Media / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Severe Sleep Apnea Diagnosis Panics Reporter Until He Finds a Simple, No-Cost Solution. (Kaiser Health News) "As a journalist who spent years covering the business of health care, I found there was more motivating my expensive testing cascade than concerns about my health."
  • Half the World Has a Clitoris. Why Don’t Doctors Study It? (New York Times) “The organ is ‘completely ignored by pretty much everyone,’ medical experts say, and that omission can be devastating to women’s sexual health.”
  • Nursing Home Surprise: Advantage Plans May Shorten Stays to Less Time Than Medicare Covers. (Kaiser Health News) "Health care providers, nursing home representatives, and advocates for residents say Medicare Advantage plans are increasingly ending members’ coverage for nursing home and rehabilitation services before patients are healthy enough to go home."
  • FDA wants to yank pregnancy drug. Firm argues Black women will suffer. (The Washington Post) “In a highly unusual move, the agency has indicated it will make the case to withdraw Makena from the market during several advisory committee meetings in Washington that began Monday morning. Covis Pharma, the company that owns the patent, is fighting to continue sales, making arguments about racial equity.”
  • Addiction Experts Fear the Fallout if California Legalizes Sports Betting. (Kaiser Health News) "[Voters] will face not one but two ballot propositions this fall aimed at capturing California’s sports betting market. Although neither appears to have strong public support, gambling addiction experts are worried about one far more than the other."
  • Ebola Is Back—and Vaccines Don’t Work Against It. (Wired) “Public health officials are racing to contain an outbreak in Uganda. It’s an urgent warning to the rest of the world.”
  • Medical Debt Sunk Her Credit. New Changes From the Credit Reporting Agencies Won’t Help. (Kaiser Health News) "Earlier this year, when three national credit agencies announced new policies to deal with medical debt, consumer advocates celebrated […] But it turns out the changes aren’t enough to help [many] Black and low-income patients, who are often the ones hit hardest by medical debt."
  • Botox and bubble baths are Band-Aids. Here’s how to avoid consumerist self-care. (Los Angeles Times) “Self-care has become synonymous with shopping for skincare, candles and even Botox. But self-care doesn’t have to be a consumerist endeavor.”
  • Hurricane Ian Shows That Coastal Hospitals Aren’t Ready for Climate Change. (Kaiser Health News) "As rapidly intensifying storms and rising sea levels threaten coastal cities from Texas to the tip of Maine, Hurricane Ian has just demonstrated what researchers have warned: Hundreds of hospitals in the U.S. are not ready for climate change."
  • FDA authorizes Novavax Covid-19 vaccine for use as a first booster shot. (CNN) “The US Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday authorized Novavax's Covid-19 vaccine for use as a first booster dose among adults 18 and older, at least six months after completing a primary Covid-19 vaccine series.”
  • Abortion Bans Skirt a Medical Reality: For Many Teens, Childbirth Is a Dangerous Undertaking. (National Public Radio) "The U.S. has one of the highest teen birth rates among developed nations, even after three decades of improvement. And Arkansas, roughly tied with Mississippi, has the highest teen birth rate in the country."