Weekly Reader - November 21, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - November 21, 2022
Photo by Timothy Eberly / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • A Billing Expert Saved Big After Finding an Incorrect Charge in Her Husband’s ER Bill. (Kaiser Health News) “The $10,563.49 in initial ER charges from a Froedtert South hospital in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, seemed high considering he basically got only an exam, X-rays, pain relief, and an arm splint.”
  • Frustrations Grow Over Company’s Response to Breathing Device Recalls. (New York Times) “Lawsuits claim the company, Philips Respironics, knew of problems with its CPAP and other machines long before notifying customers of potential health risks.”
  • States Opting Out of a Federal Program That Tracks Teen Behavior as Youth Mental Health Worsens. (Kaiser Health News) “Each state has its own rationale for opting out, but their withdrawal — when suicides and feelings of hopelessness are up — has caught the attention of school psychologists and federal and state health officials.”
  • The right foods can help lower your blood sugar. (The Washington Post) “Food is a powerful tool for keeping blood sugar, or glucose, levels in check. And making healthy choices can help you avoid prediabetes or reduce your chances for progressing from prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes, and manage your glucose levels if you already have the disease, says Hope Warshaw, a certified diabetes care and education specialist in Asheville, N.C.”
  • $38,398 for a Single Shot of a Very Old Cancer Drug. (Kaiser Health News) “The first issue is unrelenting price increases on old drugs that have remained branded as manufacturers find ways to extend patents for decades and maintain sales through marketing.”
  • Working full time doesn't always make it easier to get health insurance at the job. (CNN) “Millions of Americans have been signing up for health insurance at their companies in recent weeks. But for some full-time workers, particularly in certain industries like construction, job-based coverage isn't an option for them.”