Weekly Reader - November 28, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - November 28, 2022
Photo by Element5 Digital / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Look Up Your Hospital: Is It Being Penalized By Medicare? (Kaiser Health News) "Under programs set up by the Affordable Care Act, the federal government cuts payments to hospitals that have high rates of readmissions and those with the highest numbers of infections and patient injuries."
  • Vaccines Helped to Control COVID-19. But the Global Rollout Is Still Broken. (Time) “Vaccine development and distribution remain highly fragmented.”
  • This Open Enrollment Season, Look Out for Health Insurance That Seems Too Good to Be True. (Kaiser Health News) “Health care sharing ministries are an alternative to health insurance in which members agree to share medical expenses. They are often faith-based and can be cheaper than traditional insurance, although they don’t necessarily cover their members’ medical bills, according to a Commonwealth Fund report.”
  • The End of Vaccines at ‘Warp Speed’. (New York Times) “Financial and bureaucratic barriers in the United States mean that the next generation of Covid vaccines may well be designed here, but used elsewhere.”
  • Haven’t Seen Your Doctor in a Few Years? You May Need to Find a New One. (Kaiser Health News) “Though it is dismaying to learn you’ve been dropped from a physician’s practice because a few years have passed since your last visit, the approach isn’t uncommon.”
  • Visually impaired people less likely to access health care, CDC says. (The Washington Post) “Blindness and vision loss are among the top 10 disabilities among adults in the United States. But a new analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests people with impaired vision aren’t getting the health care they need.”