Weekly Reader - July 18, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - July 18, 2022
Photo by Max Bender / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • “F.D.A. to Weigh Over-the-Counter Sale of Contraceptive Pills” (New York Times) - Oral contraceptives currently require a prescription - but not for much longer, if the Food and Drug Administration decides to approve a new over-the-counter pill.
  • “In America, Cancer Patients Endure Debt on Top of Disease” (Kaiser Health News) - When patients are diagnosed with cancer, they are often left with not just the stress of learning that they have one of the most terrifying known diseases, but also with exorbitant costs.
  • “Keeping germs away from your kids at the ‘spraygrounds’ this summer” (Washington Post) - Splash pads can be good fun for children - but they also carry a risk for spreading nasty germs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have some tips for parents that can keep kids healthy and safe in the heat.
  • “How to Get Rid of Medical Debt — Or Avoid It in the First Place” (NPR) - Medical debt is one of the most common varieties of medical debt held by individuals in the United States. Eliminating it - or not getting it in the first place - can be a struggle for all too many people.
  • “Is BA.5 the ‘Reinfection Wave’?” (The Atlantic) - Although most people are ready to be finished with COVID-19, the latest variant called BA.5 is making headlines - and not in a good way.
  • “Three Things to Know About Insurance Coverage for Abortion” (Kaiser Health News) - Does your insurance plan cover abortion-related services? The short answer is “it depends.”
  • “Should you get a second COVID booster now, or wait for updated shots?” (National Geographic) - With concerns about BA.5 on the rise, many people eligible for COVID-19 vaccine boosters might consider holding off until boosters are shown to prevent against new variants - but is this a good plan?