Weekly Reader - January 9, 2023

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - January 9, 2023
Photo by Raimond Klavins / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • The Business of Clinical Trials Is Booming. Private Equity Has Taken Notice. (Kaiser Health News) "After finding success investing in the more obviously lucrative corners of American medicine — like surgery centers and dermatology practices — private equity firms have moved aggressively into the industry’s more hidden niches: They are pouring billions into the business of clinical drug trials."
  • Congressional Inquiry into Alzheimer’s Drug Faults Its Maker and F.D.A. (New York Times) “The report said the F.D.A.’s approval process for Aduhelm was ‘rife with irregularities’ and criticized Biogen for setting an ‘unjustifiably high price.’”
  • The Disability Tax: Medical Bills Remain Inaccessible for Many Blind Americans. (Kaiser Health News) "Health insurers and health care systems across the U.S. are breaking disability rights laws by sending inaccessible medical bills and notices, a KHN investigation found."
  • Growing vaccine hesitancy fuels measles, chickenpox resurgence in U.S. (The Washington Post) “Anti-vaccine sentiment has increased since the pandemic, driven by politicization around the coronavirus vaccine.”
  • Florida Leaders Misrepresented Research Before Ban on Gender-Affirming Care. (Kaiser Health News) "Not all transgender people experience or are diagnosed with gender dysphoria. Gender dysphoria diagnoses focus on gender identity-related psychological distress, not gender identity itself."
  • Scientists explore using psychedelics to treat alcohol, drug disorders. (Reuters) “Psilocybin and many other psychedelics are broadly prohibited under federal law. But U.S. researchers have been legally scrutinizing their use in scores of clinical trials.”