Weekly Reader - January 2, 2023

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - January 2, 2023

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Treating Long Covid Is Rife With Guesswork. (Kaiser Health News) "But there’s no standard protocol for treating long covid. And experts are casting a wide net for treatments, with few ready for formal clinical trials."
  • Why Many Older Women Are Getting Pap Tests They Don’t Need. (New York Times) “Women over 65 are being screened for cervical cancer in diminishing numbers. But some are reluctant to give up the tests.”
  • Schools, Sheriffs, and Syringes: State Plans Vary for Spending $26B in Opioid Settlement Funds. (Kaiser Health News) "With more than 200 Americans still dying of drug overdoses each day, states are beginning the high-stakes task of deciding how to spend billions of dollars in settlement funds from opioid manufacturers and distributors."
  • Coronavirus boosters cut hospitalization risk by at least 50%, CDC data shows. (The Washington Post) “Adults who received the updated coronavirus booster shots are better protected against severe disease than those who haven’t, cutting their risk of having to visit an emergency room or being hospitalized with covid-19 by 50 percent or more, according to new federal data.”
  • A New Use for Dating Apps: Chasing STDs. (Kaiser Health News) "A nationwide surge in STIs, also known as STDs — with reported cases of gonorrhea and syphilis increasing 10% and 7%, respectively, from 2019 to 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."
  • Medicaid expansion linked with improved cancer survival in young adults. (The Hill) “New data show expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act was associated with significant benefits in two-year cancer survival outcomes among young adults.”