Weekly Reader - August 29, 2022

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

Weekly Reader - August 29, 2022
Photo by Aaron Burden / Unsplash

Welcome to Finestra’s Weekly Reader, wherein we recount intriguing, important, or infamous health care-related stories you may have missed over the past week.

  • Indiana’s New Abortion Ban May Drive Some Young OB-GYNs to Leave a State Where They’re Needed. (Kaiser Health News) "For some of the Indiana OB-GYN residents — including Dr. Veronica Santana, a first-year resident — these political hurdles are a challenge they’re more than willing to take on."
  • Social Media Is Lying to You About Antidepressants. (Lifehacker) “Jonathan Stea, a clinical psychologist and adjunct assistant professor at the University of Calgary, tells Lifehacker that social media is filled with a ton of misinformation around antidepressants, other psychiatric medications, and mental illness”
  • For Kids With Kidney Disease, Pediatric Expertise Is Key — But Not Always Close By. (Kaiser Health News) "It’s important for children with kidney disease — especially end-stage kidney disease, or ESKD — to receive specialized care, but pediatric nephrology is a niche field. On top of that, specialists are not spread out evenly across the country."
  • Can’t sleep? Here’s a massive list of resources to help. (The Incidental Economist) “Sleep is important for health and wellbeing. Yet, adequate sleep is often under-attained. About 30% of adults have some insomnia symptoms. Seventeen percent of older men and 9% of older women have sleep apnea. Fortunately, there are a variety of methods — some not well known — to address sleep problems.”
  • Grassroots Work Leads to Vaccination Success in Georgia Refugee Community. (Kaiser Health News) “Those newly resettled may experience living situations or employment conditions that increase their risk of contracting the virus. Some refugees enter the country with underlying medical conditions that increase their risk of developing severe illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”
  • Your first brush with coronavirus could affect how a fall booster works. (Washington Post) “Scientists are watching in real time as original antigenic sin plays out against the coronavirus — and debating how it will influence future vaccine strategy. Contrary to its biblical thunderclap of a name, the phenomenon is nuanced — more often beneficial or neutral than harmful.”
  • California Wants to Snip Costs for Vasectomies and Condoms. (Kaiser Health News) “Federal law and state law require most health insurers to cover prescription contraceptives at no cost to the patient. But those provisions apply to only 18 FDA-approved birth control options for women, so anyone with testicles is out of luck.”
  • Why Should Monkeypox Be Renamed? (The New York Times) “Experts say the term evokes racist stereotypes, reinforces offensive tropes about Africa and abets stigmatization that can prevent people from seeking care.”
  • A Needle Exchange Project Modeled on Urban Efforts Aims to Save Lives in Rural Nevada. (Kaiser Health News) "Federal reports show people who use needle exchange programs are five times as likely to start drug treatment programs and three times as likely to stop using drugs as people who do not, but programs in Nevada and other states have faced similar pushback."
  • When Does Flu Season Start and End? (Health Magazine) “Though you can catch the flu year round, it's more prevalent during certain seasons.”
  • From Book Stacks to Psychosis and Food Stamps, Librarians Confront a New Workplace. (Kaiser Health News) "Libraries have long been one of society’s great equalizers, offering knowledge to anyone who craves it. As public buildings, often with long hours, they also have become orderly havens for people with nowhere else to go."